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Ph.D. in Anatomy

The Doctoral degree in Anatomy provides training in clinical human anatomy and independent research for individuals seeking a career in teaching and research at the medical school or university level. Research of biological structure and function focuses on clinically relevant topics or neurobiology.

A limited number of fellowships are available to support doctoral studies in Anatomy.  Doctoral fellows will be expected to participate with CASE faculty in the education of medical, professional, and graduate students working in both our teaching laboratories and classrooms.  Acceptance into the doctoral program does not guarantee the awarding of a fellowship or any other financial assistance. Consideration for a Doctoral Fellowship will be based on the qualifications of the candidate and the selection of the fellowship award recipient will be made solely by the Anatomy Graduate Program Director.

Students are admitted in the beginning of the fall semester. Application requirements include official transcripts, official scores on the Graduate Record Examination, three letters of recommendation and a goals statement as part of the admissions procedure. Materials should be uploaded as part of your online application.

Application deadline for fall admission is March 1.

Research
The Center's faculty are engaged in multidisciplinary research of biological structure and function ranging from ultrastructural to gross anatomical levels, with major interest in clinically relevant anatomy and neurobiology. Other research interests include cell biology and pathobiology. Facilities are available for autoradiography, cell culture, electrophysiology, immunocytochemistry, microsurgery, and stereotaxic neurosurgery. The Center is equipped to perform optical imaging, including bright field, phase contrast, and fluorescent microscopy. Electron microscopy is available for transmission and scanning.

Total Number of Credits Required for Graduation
60 hours (48 hours course work & 12 hours dissertation research)

 


 

Required Courses
ANAT-500 Human Gross Anatomy (8)
ANAT-510 Human Histology and Ultrastructure (5)
ANAT-520 Human Embryology (2)
ANAT-530 Human Systems Neurobiology (5)
ANAT-544 Basic Research Techniques (2)
RMET-625 Analysis of Variance and Experimental Design (3)
BBS-510 Responsible Conduct in Research (0)

Elective Courses
ANAT-632 Developmental Neurobiology (2)
ANAT-630 Advanced Systems Neurobiology (1)
ANAT-667 Visual Neuroscience (2)
ANAT-689 CASE Seminar (1)
ANAT-691 CASE Journal Club (1)
ANAT-697 Anatomy Research Topics (0-3)
PAEH-504 General Physiology (4)
PSY-A513 Advanced Physiological Psychology (3)

Required Course Descriptions
ANAT-500 Human Gross Anatomy (8)
Structure and function of human body; emphasis on anatomical relationships and concepts and their functional significance; dissection required. Spring semester
ANAT-510 Human Histology and Ultrastructure (5)
Microscopic anatomy of human body; emphasis on relationships between structure and function of tissues and organs. Fall semester
ANAT-520 Human Embryology (2) Prenatal human development; emphasis on correlation of normal development with development of common congenital malformations. Fall semester
ANAT-530 Human Systems Neurobiology (5)
Structure and function of the human nervous system; emphasis on neuroanatomical relationships of functional systems and neurobiological concepts of brain mechanisms. Spring semester
ANAT-544 Basic Research Techniques (2)
Fundamental techniques and instrumentation; emphasis on principles underlying preparation of material for histological, histochemical and ultrastructural examination and interpretation of results. Fall semester
  
BBS-510 Responsible Conduct in Research (0)
Course covers a variety of topics relevant to the ethical aspects of conducting and reporting scientific investigations including general ethical principles, use of animals and human subjects in research, authorship, mentorship, conflicts of interest and scientific misconduct. Spring semester
Elective Course Descriptions
ANAT-630 Advanced Systems Neurobiology (1)
This course to be taken concurrently with the Human Systems Neurobiology course. Lectures and moderated discussions of assigned journal articles will consider in greater detail the topics presented in the Human Systems Neurobiology course. Spring semester
ANAT-632 Developmental Neurobiology (2)
Prerequisites ANAT-530 and ANAT-630. A presentation of the principles and concepts that underlie the development of the nervous system. Lectures and discussions of assigned journal articles will cover neurogenesis, neuronal differentiation, the formation of functional neural circuit and regressive phenomena during brain development. Variable semesters
ANAT-667 Visual Neuroscience (2)
Prerequisites ANAT-530 and ANAT-634. Overview of visual processing, from chemical mechanism of transduction by retinal photoreceptors to anatomical and physiological correlates of visual perception in cerebral cortex. Assigned readings on analysis of receptive field properties, mechanisms of dark and light adaptation, sensation of color and control of ocular reflexes. Human visual dysfunctions included. Spring semester
ANAT-689 CASE Seminar (1)
Selected topics in anatomy. Attendance and participation required for all M.S.(R) and Ph.D. students. Fall/Spring semesters
ANAT-691 CASE Journal Club (1)
Selected topics in anatomy. Attendance and participation required for all M.S.(R) and Ph.D. students. Fall/Spring semesters
   

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